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Puerto Vallarta, Jal.- Location shooting for "Spectre," the latest film in the James Bond series, moves this week to Mexico City, where numerous street closings are planned.

A number of streets will closed on Thursday in the capital, where vehicular access from some thoroughfares into the Zocalo, Mexico City's largest plaza, will be restricted from 6:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.

Location shooting for the 24th installment of the Bond series will also require street closings on March 20, March 21 and March 24, as well as from March 25 to April 1, when access to the Zocalo from certain streets will also be restricted.

Traffic will be allowed to circulate on streets being used for shooting by the Bond crew on Sunday, March 22, and Sunday, March 29.

The public transit system will offer regular service at Metro Line 2's Allende and Zocalo stations, but access to the plaza at the latter station will not be allowed.

"Spectre" stars Daniel Craig, who is appearing in his fourth Bond film, and features Monica Bellucci, Lea Seydoux and Mexican actress Stephanie Sigman as the latest Bond girls.

In the the film, Agent 007 will battle the Special Executive for Counter-Intelligence, Terrorism, Revenge and Extortion, or SPECTRE, and arch villain Ernst Stavro Blofeld.

Austrian actor Christoph Waltz plays Blofeld, whose character first appears in Ian Fleming's "Thunderball" and has been featured in several Bond films.

Craig also starred as 007 in "Casino Royale," "Quantum of Solace" and "Skyfall."

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42 Caravan Protest

Puerto Vallarta, Jal.- A group of around 50 demonstrators gathered outside the Mexican consulate in New York on Wednesday morning to demand justice for the 43 Mexican college students who disappeared last September and to call for the end of a security initiative between the United States and Mexico that they claim is partially responsible for widespread violence and corruption in the country.

Among the demonstrators was Felipe de la Cruz, a teacher from the Raúl Isidro Burgos Rural Teachers' College of Ayotzinapa in the Mexican state of Guerrero, which is the school the students attended before their disappearance. De la Cruz's visit to New York is part of a caravan of the missing students' parents and friends currently making their way through the U.S. to raise awareness.

"We're in the U.S. because there are many Mexicans here in this country and we want to get their support and the support of the international community for these human rights abuses," de la Cruz said during a press conference.

The 43 students disappeared after a clash with police in the town of Iguala, about 100 miles southwest of Mexico City, and were turned them over to a local drug gang, Guerreros Unidos, who later burned the bodies, according to the federal government's version of events.

The crime has shaken the country and drawn international criticism and protests over the involvement of municipal officials and police in the disappearance of the students.

Demonstrators in New York blamed much of the pervasive violence in Mexico on the U.S. weapons and funding given to that country under the Mérida Initiative, a security strategy signed in 2008 that among other things has provided $2.1 billion to Mexico to combat drug trafficking in the country.

It is dismissively referred to as Plan Mexico, after Plan Colombia, a similar U.S. drug war initiative in that South American nation. Many critics– citing widespread corruption throughout Mexico's civil police forces and a soaring murder rate since its implementation – claim that the Mérida Initiative is doing more harm than good.

"We're targeting both the Mexican government and the United States," Ekiwah Sanchez, one of the organizers of the demonstration, told Fox News Latino. "This is a global thing because the repression and the tactics used by the Mexican government were taught here in the U.S."

The violence related to the drug trade in Mexico escalated in 2006, when then-president Felipe Calderón declared an offensive against the drug cartels. More than 60,000 people were killed in the fighting that followed.

While many people hoped that President Enrique Peña Nieto would help lower the body count, the opposite has in fact happened with almost 13,000 people being slain in drug-related violence from December 2012, when he took office, through the end of July.

The caravan of parents and friends entered the U.S. on Monday in El Paso, Texas, where family members held a rally, then split into three groups, one heading to the West Coast, East Coast and central states.

"We want to wake up the consciousness of the people in the U.S. on what is happening in Mexico," Josimar de la Cruz Ayala, brother of survivor Angel Neri de la Cruz Ayala said, according to the El Paso Times. "We need their support to demand that Mexico find the students and other people who have disappeared and bring to justice the perpetrators."

The three caravans plan on converging in Washington, D.C. where parents of the missing students will present their case to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

While in New York, de la Cruz is will attend Amnesty International USA's general meeting in Brooklyn this weekend. He is also hopeful that the group will be able to meet with United Nations officials

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Puerto Vallarta, Jal. – On Saturday, Southwest Airlines Flight 2207 did not just mark Southwest’s first flight between Aruba and Houston; it also marked the carrier’s first international arrival into Houston’s William P. Hobby Airport. Now Houston is one of a handful of cities in the U.S. to have two international airports.

Back in 1971, Southwest Airlines started flying between Dallas, Houston, and San Antonio with three Boeing 737s, and over the years, the airline rapidly expanded its reach from coast to coast. Up until it acquired AirTran Airways in September 2010, Southwest only flew within the continental U.S., but since AirTran flew to a dozen cities outside the U.S., this meant that Southwest would too.

Now that Southwest would have international access thanks to its AirTran acquisition, Southwest started looking into starting international flights in and out of Houston, but the airline would have to win over the city’s approval to build an international terminal at Houston’s William P. Hobby Airport where has build up a large presence.

To try to get the city of Houston on-board, Southwest launched the “Free Hobby” campaign in 2012, which almost sparked a war in Houston. Many in northern Houston were concerned that this would cause significant changes to United’s presence at Intercontinental Airport, but for those in south Huston, they would be able to fly out of an airport closer to their home.

Over the next few months, the city council, along with city leaders, held many debates about building an international terminal at Hobby Airport before it would go the city would make a final decision. Plus, United was very vocal about preventing Hobby from becoming an international airport.

Ultimately, Southwest won approval from the city of Houston to build the international terminal. The new $156 million, five-gate international concourse is still under construction. The new facility will increase capacity for all airport functions and add a Federal Inspections Services (FIS) facility to streamline U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) screening and baggage processing for arriving international passengers.

An airport spokesperson says that opening day is expected sometime mid-October. He also explained that Southwest will get preferred treatment at four of the five gates, and the airport is actively looking to add another international airline at Hobby once the new terminal opens

Southwest has big plans for international expansion in Houston, and back in December, the carrier announced it filed applications with the U.S. Department of Transportation to start flights to six international destinations this fall once the new international concourse opens.

Pending government approval, Southwest plans to launch new international flights from Houston to Cancun, Mexico City, Puerto Vallarta, and San Jose del Cabo in Mexico. Plus, Southwest also plans to launch flights to Belize City, Belize and San Jose, Costa Rica from Houston.

“This is an exciting first step in achieving our goal of establishing regional international air service at Hobby Airport,” said Houston Aviation Director Mario C. Diaz. “We are making dramatic progress on the new international concourse building and have a definitive route map now available from the team at Southwest Airlines. The importance of strong connectivity with Latin America and the Caribbean cannot be overstated in Houston and these flights will undoubtedly strengthen those business and cultural ties.”

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turrialba

Puerto Vallarta, Jal.- Costa Rica's main airport remained closed Friday due to drifting ash from the nearby Turrialba volcano, authorities said.

Aeris, the company that operates Juan Santamaria International Airport, located near San Jose, said 12 inbound flights had been diverted and 10 scheduled departures were put on hold.

The airport was closed at around 4:00 p.m. Thursdays and crews have been working since then to clear the runways and shore up safety measures.

Turrialba, some 43.5 miles east of San Jose erupted three times on Thursday, sending columns of smoke and ash 3,300 feet into the sky, the Costa Rica Vulcanology and Seismology Observatory said.

Strong winds pushed the ash clouds over San Jose and other cities.

Authorities have reported no casualties or serious damage from the eruptions, though farming and ranching on the slopes of Turrialba have been affected and classes were canceled at some schools.

The volcano entered a more active phase in October, with several eruptions of ash, gases and minor volumes of magma.

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Mexican agricultural officials spent several days last week meeting with a group of their countrymen living in California over a matter that had nothing to do with the typical reasons immigrants turn to their former homeland’s authorities — to reclaim or protect land back in Mexico.

Under a program that began last year, Mexico is trying to help its citizens who live in the United States resolve issues relating to farm parcels of communal land known as "ejidos," that people could lose if they do not pay dues, appear to neglect the land, or if relatives who remain in Mexico and owned the property die, leaving the land at risk of being possessed by others, according to the Los Angeles Times.

The ejidos system is an old one, started after the Mexican Revolution.

The system entailed granting peasants communal rights to farm parcels. It was part of a larger agrarian reform, the Times said.

But the rules for retaining those rights are strict, and more people have been at risk of being stripped of their ownership privileges as immigration, particularly without proper documents, from Mexico to the United States has grown since the ejidos system was put into place.

Mexican officials who have been assisting immigrants living in the United States say many do not know what their rights to land back in their homeland are, particularly when that parcel was in the name of a deceased relative, the Times said.

Catalina Rodriguez, who helps resolve disputes and ambiguity involving ejidos, has helped many Mexicans in California sort out their cases.

That has sometimes entailed research into who has ownership rights to a parcel, and other times the help is in the form of putting together the paperwork to document ownership and ensuring that the right people inherit the rights to the ejido.

Mexico also has arranged for officials there to represent immigrants in cases where the land ownership is in question, Rodriguez told the Times.

She said she is struck by how important it is to Mexicans in the United States to own land in their native homeland.

"It's their patrimony," she said.

It certainly was extremely important to Maria Gonzales, who left Mexico 25 years ago. Her parents stayed home, on their four-acre farm.

Although she had built a life here, she envisaged someday going back to Mexico and to the farm. But her parents died, and Gonzales learned that someone else had taken possession of the farm, the Times said.

Gonzales, whom the Times described as undocumented, could not return to Mexico to investigate the matter because she would risk not being able to return to Los Angeles.

Her husband, Ezequiel Becerril, said to the Times: "They're taking advantage because we can't be there.”

But she found hope when she went to see one of the Mexican government’s agricultural officials who was visiting California last week. The official found that the farm was, indeed, still under her deceased mother’s name.

"Legally, it's your mother's," the official said, according to the Times.

She got a copy of the deed from the official, which could pave the way to getting local authorities in her former hometown of Jalisco to evict the person who is there now from the farm.

"Amazing," said an emotional Gonzales, the Times reported. "Amazing."

Mexican agricultural officials spent several days last week meeting with a group of their countrymen living in California over a matter that had nothing to do with the typical reasons immigrants turn to their former homeland’s authorities — to reclaim or protect land back in Mexico.

Under a program that began last year, Mexico is trying to help its citizens who live in the United States resolve issues relating to farm parcels of communal land known as "ejidos," that people could lose if they do not pay dues, appear to neglect the land, or if relatives who remain in Mexico and owned the property die, leaving the land at risk of being possessed by others, according to the Los Angeles Times.

The ejidos system is an old one, started after the Mexican Revolution.

The system entailed granting peasants communal rights to farm parcels. It was part of a larger agrarian reform, the Times said.

But the rules for retaining those rights are strict, and more people have been at risk of being stripped of their ownership privileges as immigration, particularly without proper documents, from Mexico to the United States has grown since the ejidos system was put into place.

Mexican officials who have been assisting immigrants living in the United States say many do not know what their rights to land back in their homeland are, particularly when that parcel was in the name of a deceased relative, the Times said.

Catalina Rodriguez, who helps resolve disputes and ambiguity involving ejidos, has helped many Mexicans in California sort out their cases.

That has sometimes entailed research into who has ownership rights to a parcel, and other times the help is in the form of putting together the paperwork to document ownership and ensuring that the right people inherit the rights to the ejido.

Mexico also has arranged for officials there to represent immigrants in cases where the land ownership is in question, Rodriguez told the Times.

She said she is struck by how important it is to Mexicans in the United States to own land in their native homeland.

"It's their patrimony," she said.

It certainly was extremely important to Maria Gonzales, who left Mexico 25 years ago. Her parents stayed home, on their four-acre farm.

Although she had built a life here, she envisaged someday going back to Mexico and to the farm. But her parents died, and Gonzales learned that someone else had taken possession of the farm, the Times said.

Gonzales, whom the Times described as undocumented, could not return to Mexico to investigate the matter because she would risk not being able to return to Los Angeles.

Her husband, Ezequiel Becerril, said to the Times: "They're taking advantage because we can't be there.”

But she found hope when she went to see one of the Mexican government’s agricultural officials who was visiting California last week. The official found that the farm was, indeed, still under her deceased mother’s name.

"Legally, it's your mother's," the official said, according to the Times.

She got a copy of the deed from the official, which could pave the way to getting local authorities in her former hometown of Jalisco to evict the person who is there now from the farm.

"Amazing," said an emotional Gonzales, the Times reported. "Amazing."

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sono infantil 1

Welcome to WSD 2015. The slogan for 2015 expresses a desire that comes true for only 1/3 of the world population. Sound sleep is a treasured function and one of the pillars of health, along with a balanced diet and adequate exercise. When sleep fails, health declines. Poor sleep and bad health decrease the quality of life and take happiness away.

World Sleep Day is an annual event sponsored by the World Association of Sleep Medicine, to raise awareness of sleep disorders and highlight the burden that they place on society. World Sleep Day 2015 will be held on Friday, March 13th, 2015. Most sleep disorders are preventable or treatable, yet less than one-third of sufferers seek professional help. Sleep problems constitute a global epidemic that threatens health and quality of life for up to 45% of the world’s population. Better understanding of sleep conditions and more research into this area of medicine will help reduce the burden of sleep disorders on society.

The three elements of good quality sleep are:

a. Duration- The length of sleep should be sufficient for the sleeper to be rested and alert the following day.
b. Continuity- Sleep cycles should be seamless without interruption.
c. Depth- Sleep should be deep enough or sufficiently sound to be restorative and refreshing.

World Sleep Day 2015 offers a world stage to interested parties to join forces and reach their audiences. Sleep centers around the world are invited to teach their constituents that sleep hygiene is the science conducive to the preservation of high quality, sound and sufficient sleep. The World Association of Sleep Medicine has issued rules of hygiene that are contained in the 10 Commandments of Sleep. These rules aim to maintain or restore natural, refreshing and healthy sound sleep. Environmental conditions, such as temperature, noise, light, bed comfort, and electronic devices may modify sleep and thus play a significant role in the ability to get proper sleep—and, subsequently, in overall sleep-related wellness.

Sleep centers are also invited to tell the public that breathing regularly during sleep is critical to well-being and health. Frequent interruption of the breathing function during sleep is a pervasive and common disorder called sleep apnea, that affects 17 % of men and 9 % of women in middle and old age. Sleep centers offer diagnostic procedures and provide recommendations to control sleep apnea.

Sound sleep facilitates the preservation of mental health. Sleep disturbances are a risk factor for mental disorders such as depression and anxiety. In turn, control of these disorders improves the quality of sleep.

Failure to obtain quality sleep may lead to poor alertness, lack of attention, reduced concentration, and decreased academic productivity, while increasing the risk of motor vehicle accidents.

Thus, we return to the original slogan
‘When sleep is SOUND, health and happiness ABOUND’.

I encourage you to join World Sleep Day 2015 and contribute to improve and facilitate health and happiness around the world.

Antonio Culebras, Co-chair WSD2015Liborio Parrino, Co-chair WSD2015

Many people say that an involving melody is the best fellow to walk into Morpheus arms.

The right Music at the right moment can raise a wall between the corrupted noise of the world and the pure silence of mind, favouring the passage through the dream gates.
At the same time, the first moments of waking need the help of another musical frame, which can turn the first sound heard into the most beautiful melody across the whole new day.
If you want to see how it works, Stay Tonight.

Francesco Parrino(composer of “Stay Tonight”)

To download Stay Tonight part one Click HERE and part two HERE.

More music from Francesco ParrinoWebsite: http://youtubesheetmusic.com/artists/francesco-parrino/
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/francescoparrinoF
acebook: https://www.facebook.com/Francesco.Parrino.Officia
lTwitter: https://twitter.com/FraPar_piano

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Spring Forward Time

A sure sign that spring's on the horizon: One hour less shut-eye Saturday night no matter when you turn out the lights.

Most people in the U.S. are supposed to push the clock forward by 60 minutes before heading to bed Saturday night. Daylight saving time officially begins at 2 a.m. Sunday local time.

You may have lost a bit of sleep, but in the months ahead you'll gain an extra hour of sunlight in the evenings.

It's also a good time to replace batteries in warning devices such as smoke detectors.

The time change isn't observed by Hawaii, most of Arizona, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam and the Northern Marianas.

Daylight saving time ends Nov. 1.

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 rod

Puerto Vallarta, Jal.- Emmy-winning host and fashion expert Rodner Figueroa is apologizing to Michelle Obama for the racist comments he made about her during a show on the Spanish-language network Univision on Wednesday.

Figueroa, who was fired that same day, broke his silence in a letter released Thursday, offering his most sincere apologies and saying his comments were misinterpreted. During the live broadcast, the 42-year-old said the First Lady “looks like she was from the ‘Planet of the Apes,’

“I would like to clarify that I am not a racist and my comments were in no way directed toward you, but toward the characterization made by the makeup artist,” he wrote in Spanish.

“I am embarrassed, I ask for forgiveness, because there is no excuse for a professional like me to make comments like this that can be misinterpreted as offensive and racist during such a volatile time in our country.”

He continued: “I take responsibility for this error in judgment on my part, but I cannot accept being called a racist and fired like this, humiliated by Univision, after 17 years there.”

“I come from a bi-racial Latino family, with family members like my father, who are Afro-Latino. I am the first openly gay host on Spanish-language television and I have been an activist for causes to help minorities, who like me have been discriminated against,” Figueroa explained.

Figueroa made his comment during a segment of “El Gordo y la Flaca,” when the hosts were talking about make-up artist Paolo Ballesteros, who has been making headlines recently for transforming himself into celebrities like Kim Kardashian, Jennifer Lopez, Ariana Grande, Jennifer Lawrence, Cher and the First Lady.

It was while showing Ballesteros' transformation of himself turning into Obama that Figueroa made his comment.

On Thursday, Univision issued a statement confirming Figueroa's departure from the network.

“Yesterday during the entertainment program ‘El Gordo y La Flaca,’ Rodner Figueroa made some comments about First Lady Michelle Obama that were completely reprehensible and in no way a reflection of the values and opinions of Univision. As a result, Mr. Figueroa was fired immediately,” statement read.

Figueroa no longer appears on Univision's talent page.

In his letter, the Venezuelan-American host wrote that Univision gave him a verbal notification of his departure. He claimed network executives leaked the news and “condemned me on social media, trying to destroy my career in an unjust manner, without even officially notifying me in writing nor without a proper investigation of the situation.”

Soon after the news of Figueroa’s departure was made public, Lili Estefan and Raul de Molina, hosts of “El Gordo y la Flaca” defended their ex-co-host saying that calling him a racist is “ridiculous.”

“I think Rodner was definitely wrong (in what he said), but calling him a racist is ridiculous,” Estefan told People En Español. “Rodner is someone who makes fun of himself. For those who don’t know it, his father is Black.”

De Molina said: “I’ve known Rodner since we worked together in Telemundo… Although we have our conflicts in front of the camera, I love him dearly. I don’t think his comment had a racist undertone, of that I am sure. Rodner is indispensable to ‘El Gordo y la Flaca.’”

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lost city 1 3219015bTrees are still thick within a pocket of jungle in the Mosquitia
that is home to the ruins of an ancient civilization.

A team of archaeologists were searching for the fabled “White City,” also known as the “City of the Monkey God,” in the Honduras jungle. But during the course of their hunt, they say they may have stumbled upon something far more remarkable: not merely a long-lost city, but an entire, unidentified civilization.

The story of this discovery begins in 2012 when an aerial survey of a remote valley in La Mosquitia, Honduras, revealed evidence of the ruins of a pre-Columbian city. Some experts thought the ruins might be part of the legendary “White City.”

As National Geographic reported:

"For a hundred years, explorers and prospectors told tales of the white ramparts of a lost city glimpsed above the jungle foliage. Indigenous stories speak of a 'white house' or a 'place of cacao' where Indians took refuge from Spanish conquistadores—a mystical, Eden-like paradise from which no one ever returned."

The site of the “White City” has never been confirmed.

With the support of the Honduran government, the team recently embarked on an expedition to the surveyed area to discover firsthand whether or not the “White City” had actually been located. What they found astounded them.

National Geographic, which sent a reporter and photographer along for the expedition, reports that the team did indeed find an ancient and untouched city. The archaeologists surveyed “extensive plazas, earthworks, mounds and an earthen pyramid” as well as “a remarkable cache” of more than 50 stone sculptures.

Christopher Fisher, an archaeologist on the team, told the magazine that the unspoiled condition of the site was “incredibly rare.”

The site is estimated to date back to 1,000 to 1,400 A.D.

o LOST CITY 570A cache of more than 50 artifacts, found partly exposed,
lie in a secret location in the Mosquitia jungle in Honduras.

While this discovery has been celebrated as the long-anticipated unearthing of the storied "White City," archaeologists say that they no longer believe there's just one “lost city” in Mosquitia. Instead, the team says the area may be home to many "lost cities" -- places that were once inhabited by an entire, now-lost civilization.

This culture likely thrived a millennia ago, and then disappeared, the archaeologists say.

It's a culture that's almost unknown. It does not even have a name.

Fisher told The Huffington Post in an email this week that the discovery of the lost city has enormous implications for the understanding of the region and its history.

"The documentation of the site and associated features is very significant for Honduras and broader pre-Columbian societies in Latin America," he said.

Fisher added that much more research needs to be conducted to find out more about this lost civilization. He said the team hopes to soon "begin a long-term program of archaeological and ecological research" in the Mosquitia area.

As for what might have caused this civilization to disappear, Fisher offered one possible explanation: European-introduced disease.

“Old World disease decimated native populations in the Americas starting with the fall of the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan,” Fisher told HuffPost. “These same diseases then raced person to person throughout the Americas with an incredible mortality rate. Like every other ancient culture in the Americas the impact of these events would have had devastating consequences for the ancient peoples of the Mosquitia.”

Fisher stressed, however, that there could be many other explanations for the culture’s demise. Societal collapse, environmental triggers or conflict, for instance, may have played a role.

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Dog Trained to Diagnose Thyroid Cancer by Sniffing Patients Pee

Puerto Vallarta, Jal.- A dog trained by U.S. scientists has learned to detect thyroid cancer in undiagnosed individuals, according to a study presented at the 97th annual meeting of the U.S. Endocrine Society held over the weekend in San Diego.

The canine, a German shepherd called Frankie, nailed the diagnosis in 88.2 percent of the cases just by smelling the urine of the 34 participants in the experiment.

Dogs have a sense of smell 10 times keener than man, the reason the team believes that "scent-trained canines could be used by physicians to detect the presence of thyroid cancer at an early stage and to avoid surgery when unwarranted," endocrine oncology expert Donald Bodenner at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, or UAMS, the lead author of the study, said.

While Bodenner does not suggest taking decisions for treating patients based on the canine technique, he said the dog's diagnostic precision was only slightly inferior to that achieved by extracting cells with a needle for a biopsy, the usual method.

To do the study, the team first trained Frankie to recognize the scent of cancerous thyroid tissue from samples extracted from multiple patients.

The researchers than had him sniff urine samples from 34 untested patients before taking a biopsy of their thyroid nodules, in which 15 people were diagnosed with cancer and 19 tested negative.

Frankie, who was trained to lie down when he identified thyroid cancer in a sample and to move on if the urine was clean, made the correct diagnosis in 30 of the 34 cases.

The scientists said they plan to expand their study in collaboration with Auburn University's College of Veterinary Medicine, given that the canine detection of odors has the advantage of being non-invasive and low in cost.

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Hundreds of Roughrider fans show their rider pride in the desert

Puerto Vallarta, Jal.- From Vatican City to Costa Rica, there's a good chance you’ve spotted a Rider fan while travelling outside of Canada.

And those attending the hockey game tonight in Glendale, Ari., between the Anaheim Ducks and the Arizona Coyotes -- they're going to get a big helping of green and white.

That's because it's Rider Day in Arizona and close to 500 Saskatchewan Roughrider fans are expected at a special pre-game party with Rider receiver Chris Getzlaf.

Rider fans will also have their own section during the hockey game, which will likely be one of the more rowdy corners of the arena. After the game 350 fans will get the chance to have their picture taken at centre ice.

When asked where’s the strangest place you’ve seen a Rider fan, texters into 306-306 had a long list of places including the tailgate party in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, where more than 400 Rider fans gather each year.

“We were on a Mediterranean cruise and I saw two people with their Riders jacket on.”

“I was in Ecuador in 2007 and in Quito me and my buddy found a bar owned by a guy from Saskatchewan and they had a rider flag up on the wall.”

“We were in Lunenburg, N.S. last June and we went into a gift shop the owner noticed my Rider hat and came over to say hi. It was Terry Baker the punter for the Riders in 1989! I Told him I was at the Grey Cup in 89, got my picture with him and his Grey Cup ring!”

“I was waiting to board Catamaran in Kauai wearing my Rider hat of course. Guy yells "Go Riders.” Turns out he was from Lloydminster.”

When I was in Las Vegas last weekend I was wearing a Rider shirt and hat walking down the strip and I hear let's go riders I saw another Rider shirt gave a nod.”

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